Prophecy Made Simple

ritw_logo_WPIn the book of Acts, chapter 8, we find the Ethiopian eunuch reading a passage from the scriptures that began “He was led as a sheep to slaughter…”  When Philip approached and heard him reading this passage from Isaiah, he asked the eunuch if he understood what he was reading.  Do you remember the eunuch’s response?  He responded with “How could I, unless someone guides me.”

I am truly thankful for the scriptures “which are able to give you the wisdom that leads to salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.” 2 Tim 3:15 (NASB)  I am even more grateful that I don’t have the disadvantage of the religious leaders of Jesus’ time.  In addition to the same writings they had, we also have the writings of the apostles who recorded the life and ministry of Jesus Christ and were guided by the Holy Spirit to reveal more perfectly to the Lord’s people how to live their lives as His children.

Isaiah 59 was our passage for study this week as we looked at the advantage we have over God’s earlier followers.  Our comparison of Isaiah’s prophesy with actual events in the Gospel accounts was designed to help us realize how God revealed His will through the prophets so that God’ people could know when it unfolded.  The sad part of the scenario is that when the events occurred, they went unnoticed or were rejected altogether.  This was especially true with the greatest of all prophecies that being the one to reconcile man to his Creator, Jesus Christ, the Son of the Living God.  How sad it is to know that those chosen of God to bring about and herald the coming of the messiah wanted absolutely nothing to do with Him.  They were responsible for the death of the Son of God and when some heard that message in Act chapter 2 they were pricked in the heart and immediately sought what they should do.  Read Isaiah 59 again for yourself and see his portrayal of God’s salvation and reflect on how it played out nearly 780 years after it was foretold.  You’ll appreciate it more every time you read it!

Copyright © 2003, Nolan P. Rutter

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